The Great Good Fathers Create In The World

Photo by Kelli McClintock on Unsplash

Given toxic masculinity, anti-patriarchy sentiment en vogue and some people’s perspective on fatherhood – or the absence thereof – one might wonder: why on earth do we celebrate fathers when fathers are….well…men? In Copiosis, everyone creates benefit, even fathers…even absent fathers…even men. So every man merits celebration.

What’s cool about Copiosis is, fathers can choose fatherhood…or not…with no repercussions to anyone because everyone’s free. Such freedom creates huge shifts in family life.

Donald Trump exemplifies why we need this freedom. Whether you like him or not, well known now are difficulties he had with his dad, Fred. Donald’s niece, Dr. Mary Trump, a clinical psychologist with a PhD in Advanced Psychological Studies, published a tell-all book about her uncle (Donald). But, according to some, her book makes Fred the villain and the former president Fred’s victim.

Trump’s behavior shows his poor parenting. Understanding this, one sees Trump in new light. He becomes exactly what Dr. Trump describes: an effect of a greater malevolent cause: his dad.

Similar origins spawn many societal troubles. In families, children learn what they do later as adults. Many a despot, sociopath, psychopath or plain old asshole owe parents for who they are. Often their fathers own all the credit. Such paternal chains link men to legacies both good and bad.

Choice breaks these chains.

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Men can choose in Copiosis

Today society reels from many social upheavals, including massive push-back against white males and patriarchy dominance. Old days saw none of this. Everyone conformed, for better or worse.

So did fathers. In Fred Trump’s time, fathers did their best. But in doing so kicked abuse, harassment, shaming, anger, frustration and withholding love, into their future (our present) like cans down a temporal highway. And it’s likely Fred was a victim of his father’s upbringing. Just as Donald is to his.

For sure, some chose back then. They left their families, or chose family-free lives. Today we see much more choosing. More than 20 percent of fathers live separate from their children.

Today’s popular Men Going Their Own Way (MGTOW) is a movement whose members reject all male-female relations. These men find nothing valuable in fatherhood.

An even less healthy movement called “Incel” characterizes even more choosing. Incels and MGTOW men face social ridicule. But their choices keep some bad upbringing out of would be families.

Everyone can choose

In their choosing, families, children, mothers and the world in general can choose too. Choices make it hard on moms sometimes. Single motherhood and cake walks share nothing in common. Single fathers also find such choices difficult.

Still, making that hard choice can break generations of bad parenting. Statistics show higher abuse rates in single-parent families according to many sources. But Copiosis mitigates that.

In Copiosis mothers don’t need men, and resources men offer, to raise kids. And men don’t need to do what they don’t want to, or can’t do. According to many sources, neglect is most common abuse. Physical abuse comes in second. We expect both will become less common as producers give necessities to all at no cost.

It also works the other way: loving men, ready, willing and eager, can lovingly raise children with, or without women. And loving couples can, should they desire, spend all their time loving their children with NBR and necessities flowing in.

Vaginal tyranny and little heads

Depending on the source, between 77 and 44 percent of births are unintended. Maybe that explains why roughly 7 million fathers have no relationship with their minor children. Some fathers don’t want to be.

Why do such births happen?

Vaginal tyranny shares the blame among many factors. Generally, men both revile and revere the vagina. That’s because strong attachment to vaginas makes some powerless to their allure.

Some men will do anything to get their little head in a vagina. While inside they forget how they got here (through a vagina). Through that lapse life-long responsibility gets created along with life.

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Better worlds for everyone

But in Copiosis, a horny guy needn’t worry about his seed’s results. A horny woman who “accidentally” allows unwanted germination doesn’t require the germinator’s participation post…er…participation.

New mothers also need a father who doesn’t want to be one. With necessities available to everyone at no cost and with income opportunities more plentiful than today, they can go it alone and succeed easily.

If they want, mothers can spend the next 18 years raising their children. They get everything they need. Should friends can help, they too get NBR in the process. So can parents or anyone else, such as a professional care-giver.

What about the child and its relationship to its father? Some may ask that and point to studies showing negative impacts from absentee fatherhood.

Photo by Jhonatan Saavedra Perales on Unsplash

Everything the child needs is given

But those negative effects get attention too. One, larger communities than the nuclear family mitigate such effects. Everyone helping raise kids receive NBR. Extended families can pitch in too.

Therapy also is abundant. And, the father can participate should he want, doing so on his own terms instead of those set forth by courts, lawyers, societal expectations or law.

Everyone is free in Copiosis. No one is wrong. Today absent dads face societal pressure in their choice not to father. Some of that may continue in Copiosis. But in time though, we’ll see less blaming, judging negatively and demanding others meet arbitrary expectations.

When that happens, everyone will merit celebrations. Even dads who choose not to be dads. At that point, who needs Father’s Day? Every day becomes a celebration. A celebration wherein everyone creates great good.

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